Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

I'd just like to say anosmia probably wouldn't be a factor,

being anosmic means not being able to smell it in the first place, not over a period of time. Someone who believes fragrances does not last on them, is not anosmic- because if they compare the perfumes on their skin to someone else's skin and realize it lasts longer on their skin- that rules out anosmia. I'm anosmic to Coco Mademoiselle. As popular as Coco Mademoiselle is- I've never ever ever smelled it on another person. I literally can't, it just does not register in my brain. Have no idea how long it lasts lol it's like spraying water on my skin. Losing the ability to smell a fragrance over a period of time would mean olfactory fatigue, but that wouldn't happen with a lot of fragrances every single time I don't think.

Last edited by chanelnumerocinq (2013-02-04 20:56:34)

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Sirenn wrote:

Personally, I've tried extending the longevity of my fragrances in a myriad of ways. Layering with matching or complimentary body lotion; layering with matching or complimentary body sprays/mists; applying to a variety of different body areas (not exclusively "pulse points"); using different methods of application, from splash bottles to rollerballs to sprays; ad infinitum. In most cases, all extra effort is for naught. My skin does not seem to project noticeable silage after 1 hour of application, and often the scent is completely unnoticeable - even at "nose to the skin" range - after 3 - 4 hours.

I wouldn't be at all surprised if environment was a factor, as I live in the notoriously arid Southwest where dry(er) skin is nearly unavoidable. That being said, on rare occasion a fragrance will project very strongly when I least expect it. This happened the other day while wearing Pacifica's Tibetan Mountain Temple, which is usually one of the typical "gone in 4 hours" varieties.

So to sum up, I don't feel that the "perfume eating skin" is a myth or a commentary on a person's fail-ability to detect scent. To suggest such a thing does smack as an insult, though I don't think it was intended as such. But for some of us, it's simply a reality.

.  I've been reading this thread, and staying out of it, but have you considered the fact that most of your perfumes are inherently light?

You are a soul; you have a body.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Hypnotic Poison isn't...

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

chanelnumerocinq wrote:

Hypnotic Poison isn't...

. Okay, there's one.  Out of how many?   smile

You are a soul; you have a body.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Bobby in Alaska wrote:
Sirenn wrote:

Personally, I've tried extending the longevity of my fragrances in a myriad of ways. Layering with matching or complimentary body lotion; layering with matching or complimentary body sprays/mists; applying to a variety of different body areas (not exclusively "pulse points"); using different methods of application, from splash bottles to rollerballs to sprays; ad infinitum. In most cases, all extra effort is for naught. My skin does not seem to project noticeable silage after 1 hour of application, and often the scent is completely unnoticeable - even at "nose to the skin" range - after 3 - 4 hours.

I wouldn't be at all surprised if environment was a factor, as I live in the notoriously arid Southwest where dry(er) skin is nearly unavoidable. That being said, on rare occasion a fragrance will project very strongly when I least expect it. This happened the other day while wearing Pacifica's Tibetan Mountain Temple, which is usually one of the typical "gone in 4 hours" varieties.

So to sum up, I don't feel that the "perfume eating skin" is a myth or a commentary on a person's fail-ability to detect scent. To suggest such a thing does smack as an insult, though I don't think it was intended as such. But for some of us, it's simply a reality.

. I've been reading this thread, and staying out of it, but have you considered the fact that most of your perfumes are inherently light?

some perfumes I wear are very light but Alien, Poeme, Giorgio, and Coco are a few heavier scents I wear.

They are quite strong when first applied but wear down to a skin scent pretty quickly. If I want them to last I have to spray my clothing.

As an aside I am fair skinned, not oily, freckled in the sun and run a warmer than normal temp.  I wasn't exaggerating when I say most people have no idea       That I even wear perfume.

If my daughter oversprays it is like she is enveloped in a cloud glad.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Bobby in Alaska wrote:
chanelnumerocinq wrote:

Hypnotic Poison isn't...

. Okay, there's one. Out of how many?  smile

From Sirenn's wardrobe in particular...these all last 8+ hours on me:

http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.146.jpg Bvlgari Eau Parfumee au The Rouge http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.219.jpg Dior Hypnotic Poison http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.8468.jpg Avon mark Sophistique http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.147.jpg Nina Ricci Nina http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.3681.jpg Jean Paul Gaultier Ma Dame http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.819.jpg Burberry Burberry Brit http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.2938.jpg Estée Lauder Sensuous

Just for reference.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

bookishbeauty wrote:
Bobby in Alaska wrote:
chanelnumerocinq wrote:

Hypnotic Poison isn't...

. Okay, there's one. Out of how many?  smile

From Sirenn's wardrobe in particular...these all last 8+ hours on me:

http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.146.jpg  Bvlgari Eau Parfumee au The Rouge http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.219.jpg  Dior Hypnotic Poison http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.8468.jpg  Avon mark Sophistique http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.147.jpg  Nina Ricci Nina http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.3681.jpg  Jean Paul Gaultier Ma Dame http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.819.jpg  Burberry Burberry Brit http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.2938.jpg  Estée Lauder Sensuous

Just for reference.

. For myself, only the http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.3911.jpg  Dior L`Elixir Hypnotic Poison has any lasting ability, although I haven't tried http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.8468.jpg  Avon mark Sophistique.

You are a soul; you have a body.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Bobby in Alaska wrote:
bookishbeauty wrote:
Bobby in Alaska wrote:

. Okay, there's one. Out of how many?  smile

From Sirenn's wardrobe in particular...these all last 8+ hours on me:

http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.146.jpg  Bvlgari Eau Parfumee au The Rouge http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.219.jpg  Dior Hypnotic Poison http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.8468.jpg  Avon mark Sophistique http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.147.jpg  Nina Ricci Nina http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.3681.jpg  Jean Paul Gaultier Ma Dame http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.819.jpg  Burberry Burberry Brit http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.2938.jpg  Estée Lauder Sensuous

Just for reference.

. For myself, only the http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.3911.jpg  Dior L`Elixir Hypnotic Poison has any lasting ability, although I haven't tried http://fimgs.net/images/perfume/m.8468.jpg  Avon mark Sophistique.

I think this just confirms the idea that there is no such thing as a perfume that lasts on everyone, or couldn't last for anyone...we all get different longevity for the reasons already stated. I usually don't really even look at the longevity votes, other than to see if they are skewed toward "poor" or "long lasting," and even then only if there are 100+ votes, because I tend to find that that particular facet of perfume is so subjective.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

bookishbeauty wrote:

I think, for you to believe that "perfume-eating skin" is rubbish, you have to also believe that those who believe they have it are very foolish indeed. Perfume lasts a very long time on me, even when it does not last for others, so it's difficult for me to understand how it could be that it does not last on others. However, I give them credit for being intelligent people who usually have done many tests, including asking others if they can smell the perfume, before determining that perfume doesn't last on them. I think that people probably know for themselves how long perfume lasts.

For the record, several of those on your "cheap, non-longlasting" list last all day on me.

My point exactly. glad Chemistry is a huge factor, as well as the the temperature of the skin. Almost all fragrances last long on me (my skin is never too warm), but my skin tends to eat up all the heavy notes such as musks, civet, and oakmoss. I know this because I always test perfumes with my mom---a person who's chemical makeup is a lot different than mine. Almost all the fragrances we tried turned out differently.

I'm in in love with 3 Jacques----Jacques Guerlain, Jacques Polge, and Jacques Cavallier.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

chanelnumerocinq wrote:

I'd just like to say anosmia probably wouldn't be a factor,

being anosmic means not being able to smell it in the first place, not over a period of time. Someone who believes fragrances does not last on them, is not anosmic- because if they compare the perfumes on their skin to someone else's skin and realize it lasts longer on their skin- that rules out anosmia. I'm anosmic to Coco Mademoiselle. As popular as Coco Mademoiselle is- I've never ever ever smelled it on another person. I literally can't, it just does not register in my brain. Have no idea how long it lasts lol it's like spraying water on my skin. Losing the ability to smell a fragrance over a period of time would mean olfactory fatigue, but that wouldn't happen with a lot of fragrances every single time I don't think.

Not only anosmia or olfactory fatigue, but olfactory sensitivity in general. Each human has a different acuity with regard to this area. Everyone creature does, even dogs. Rates vary between species and also between individuals within species.

Some people can be therefore even MORE or LESS sensitive to various accords than most other people are on the average, and this too can vary with surrounding environment and hormonal/chemical changes in the brain.

Combining these differences with differing skin chemistry (different rates of shedding moisture & skin, and therefore various different scent molecule shed rate) and there is an innumerable variation in how perfume will react on one individual, and how each individual will perceive that difference at any given time.

Last edited by RosaMilena (2013-02-04 23:50:01)

The impermanence of life is what makes it so very precious. Carpe Noctem!

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

I wish my skin ate fat instead.

Have perfume, will travel.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

white_ wrote:

you know... I'm not sure what happens.



When I like a perfume, it always seems to me it doesn't last long enough. Most of the times anyway.

but when I dislike a perfume, even if it's very week, I can feel it going strong even after I scrub.

I think there is a psychological element involved which hasn't even been touched on that makes for even more variability in perception.

Maybe what you dislike is of a stronger scent concentration?

I think there is a sort of built in biological safety mechanism deep in our primal brains that recognizes certain scents as unsafe by making them typically unpleasant to many humans regardless of ethnicity or culture.

Scents of advanced decomposition are generally repulsive. Natural gas piped into housing units for heat or utility use is scented with an odor typically repulsive to most humans so that an overabundance of it (say perhaps due to a leak) will be detected and the individual will call the gas company or get out of the building to avoid harm.

People can be anosmic or insensitive or hypersensitive to even those things though.

I would say the scent of certain toxic substances are generally unpleasant to most people, like the scent of formalin.

Formalin scent in my experience will linger on even after several days, even after repeated showering.

Perhaps this is mother nature's way of insuring some of us avoid contact with harmful substances; a biological evolutionary safety stopgap to insure survival.

Maybe this is why perfumes you dislike, though they may not be directly harmful to you, linger longer in your perception.

Last edited by RosaMilena (2013-02-05 02:17:01)

The impermanence of life is what makes it so very precious. Carpe Noctem!

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

swim_fatale wrote:

I wish my skin ate fat instead.

Swim you cute thing!  Now I'm thinking......ASIAN HORROR FILM!!!!

17

The impermanence of life is what makes it so very precious. Carpe Noctem!

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

RosaMilena wrote:
swim_fatale wrote:

I wish my skin ate fat instead.

Swim you cute thing! Now I'm thinking......ASIAN HORROR FILM!!!!

  17



Just wanted to lighten up the mood here.  40

Have perfume, will travel.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

30 Swim!!!!

The impermanence of life is what makes it so very precious. Carpe Noctem!

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

RosaMilena wrote:

  30 Swim!!!!



  18 A rose for a rose.

Last edited by swim_fatale (2013-02-05 02:26:10)

Have perfume, will travel.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

It could be time for " real perfume". Wheeee. Hold on to your wallet. Have to say I have no regrets from any purchase of the real thing. Did without a few I wanted to save up for them. They last for days.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Hello Ladies,

I tried to follow all conversation but I skipped a bit. I have 2 things to share. Well, I do agree that the quality of scent depends on skin and body overall, condition. There is one point that we have a certain skin type, dry, oily or whatever. There are hormons as well, illnesses, vitamines!!! They say, that Japanese women need way less scent than German ones. Why? Because of diet!!! Japanese do not eat so meaty as Germans. There are not so many other smells going out of their body. Rice and veggies do not smell so strong. Remember that all we eat, IS in our body for a while. That is why vegetarians need to apply less perfume as well. Nevertheless I am talking about the case while everything works more or less in the body. Diabetes can have it different as well!! Is it so difficult to understand that we all differ and it is possible that some scents are eaten by our skin????

And the second thing: actually, why do we all expect that eau de toilette or even eau de perfume is suppose to give 6 meters silage?! superglad if you want to intoxicate people with your scent, go for pure perfume. But generally it was not a meaning for edt or edp, to be noticed from 10 meters away. And it is good to check first if the scent that you think is gone... is really gone?! I am the person who often doesn't realize that the fragrance still exist on me. It is normal that we get used to the scent that surrounds us. It becomes softer so we do not detect it anymore, but it is still there!!!!



Love to everyone!!!

Last edited by Margreet (2013-02-06 09:20:14)

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

The number of active apocrine glands and the amount of excretions varies WIDELY among humans on this planet. That is just ONE HUGE innate scent difference factor. Doesn't matter what you eat or how often you bathe, this difference counts for a lot in the way of innate body odor. It's genetic too.

Another interesting point would be widely differing reactions seen by medical personnel in patients who have been administered various topically applied medications. Skin chemistry plays a HUGE part regarding innate sensitivities and effectiveness of any topically applied medication. Yes, the medication is still generally classified as being approved to treat XYZ condition, but any doctor or nurse can tell you that any person may have an allergic reaction, an intolerant reaction, general ineffectiveness or whatnot depending purely on individual idiosyncrasies.

Therefore it stands to reason that perfume, while generally remaining recognizable on most people, in fact can vary considerably in scent reaction from initial opening spray to full drydown on each individual. Again, some individuals may be anosmic to the difference, but others may be highly sensitive to it.

Again, the molecular structure of the medication or perfume doesn't change, but the scent wafting from the person just like the reaction of a topically applied medication on a person's skin can potentially vary significantly.

Last edited by RosaMilena (2013-02-06 09:24:13)

The impermanence of life is what makes it so very precious. Carpe Noctem!

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

And additional: I think instead of arguing about something that is quite clear, we should switch to talk about how to treat our skin and what to eat and what not ( not saying that people should be vegetarians thought, but if you have a problem with fading scent and you eat chilli every day, well, there is something to change) to keep the fragrance working.



xx hjarta

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

swim_fatale wrote:

I wish my skin ate fat instead.

LOL!!!

anw, i dunno what kinda skin i have but perfume doesnt last on me...i hv given up on just spraying myself in the morning...cos for some reason, ppl dun smell it on me...i have checked w my co-workers many times..so i know it's not olfactory fatigue def...perfumes just doesnt get projected.

i went to Sephora n a SA sprayed a perfume that he feels is pretty strong on my wrist...n within a few minutes...it sat close to my skin...he held my wrist right to his nose n smelled..indeed...it becomes a scent tt's really close to skin...

now my method is...i bring by bottles to the office and touch up whenever i feel like it...now all my co-workers comment they can smell me..n how good i smell lol jk!

Inspiring humanity.

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Another idea, I find that perfume lasts much longer on the inside of my elbow than on my wrist. I also find that by not applying on my neck I don't become used to the scent. Spraying scarves works really well for me!

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Margreet wrote:

And additional: I think instead of arguing about something that is quite clear, we should switch to talk about how to treat our skin and what to eat and what not ( not saying that people should be vegetarians thought, but if you have a problem with fading scent and you eat chilli every day, well, there is something to change) to keep the fragrance working.



xx hjarta



This is a recurring topic

http://www.fragrantica.com/board/viewtopic.php?id=50525

"On the internet, nobody knows you're a dog."

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

I have a lot of trouble finding a perfume that I can spray and that lasts on me.  I read some of the reviews and some say they last 8 hours.  I have bought that same perfume, and could spray myself twenty times in the neck, chest, arms, belly, etc etc etc ... and within an hour or so, it's gone and nobody smells anything on me, unless they are very near me.  So, I don't think it's the perfumes.  It's definately a problem with some people's skin.  I purchased Dior Homme Intense and I can spray myself ten times and within an hour or so, it's gone!  I have perfume bottles with me in my purse or at work every single day and I re-apply a few times a day.



41

A woman's perfume tells more about her, than her handwriting

Re: perfume eating skin - a myth?

Cybernoir, thank you for the link, though, I was thinking more about how to help to fix certain issues .. not how to apply perfume actually. wink

p.s I love your avatar dog hjarta