sherapop Perfume Wardrobe and Profile


Fragrant friends: I now have two blogs and invite you to join me--comments are always welcome!

sherapop's salon de parfum:
http://salondeparfum-sherapop.blogspot.com

searchable perfume review archives:
http://sherapop.blogspot.com/


------------------------
Perfume Destiny


My journey through perfume, a universe unto itself, began rather late in life: as a freshman in college, I had taken to wearing a heavily rose-laden scent received from someone (whose name I forget or repress) as a gift, to which my boyfriend at the time swiftly retaliated with a 3.4 ounce bottle of Oscar de la Renta eau de toilette. He nearly begged me to abandon the octogenarian rose water (its name, A Rose is a Rose, exemplified truth in advertising) for his offering, a far more sophisticated and olfactorily complex scent. I immediately grasped the superior quality of Oscar, though I was entirely ignorant as to the how and the why. Little did I know that Oscar’s own rose and tuberose components were deeply ensconced in a layer of jasmine, ylang-ylang, and broom; and fixed from below with a sweet spiciness comprising patchouli, lavender, opopanax, cloves, vetiver, castoreum, myrrh, and sandalwood. I did not even know the general category under which this perfume was subsumed: floral oriental. I only knew that it smelled good.

By the bottom of the first bottle, I was already addicted. Oscar had become my scent, and everyone knew, above all my family, who literally showered me with eau de toilette, eau de parfum, and sundry bath products for years to come. Oscar was so much my signature, that when I smelled it on others, I thought of myself. I was hypnotized by Oscar to the point where other widely worn fragrances at the time—the loud fruity-fresh floral Lauren comes immediately to mind—elicited from me an immediate attitude of disdain toward the wearer. Only a sorority girl would sport such a scent, while I, a GDI, had transcended the ranks of la foule. Today, with the benefit of hindsight, I recognize that my total devotion to Oscar was not so different from the Christianity of those who happen to have been born in Christian, as opposed to Muslim nations.

Like the middle ages, my Oscar period was devoid of the type of critical analysis that might lead one to apostasy. No, none of the details mattered to me. Why Oscar smelled so delectable, and inspired a smile each time I lifted the collar of my shirt to take a sniff, was as irrelevant in my view as the rules of tonal counterpoint to the synoptic perfection of the music of J. S. Bach. Dissecting Oscar into its tripartite components held no interest for me—-my love of the scent had as much to do with the precise identity of the top notes (orange flower, basil, cilantro, and cascarilla), as the key (E major) in which Beethoven happened to have composed the divine Opus 109. Looking back, such a comparison seems particularly apt, for the perfumes of Oscar de la Renta have proven, as a group, to be as uneven to my nose as is the oeuvre of the great creator of Opus 109 to my mind. But, at the time, I was living in Oscar’s heaven on earth, and no one, it seemed, was capable of shaking my faith.

That I came at last to abandon Oscar, like my fortuitous introduction to the perfume, was the result of a man. This time, my new beau harbored a deep-seated rancor toward not a particular scent, whether grandmotherly or cloyingly sweet, but any scent at all that did not emanate naturally from my own cells. There was no use putting up resistance, I could no longer wear Oscar—-or any perfume-—during this relationship, which somehow lasted a few years. Eventually we parted ways, which clearly demonstrates a fundamental metaphysical truth. While some would say that the rupture had more to do with our divergent views on the importance of building a family, on whether it would be appropriate for an agnostic to convert to Judaism, or whether a woman should trade her name for that of her husband, I, on the contrary, attribute the end of the relationship to our differences regarding a far more weighty matter: perfume.

Like a child with a large bag in a candy store with no clerk or surveillance camera, I made the most of my liberation from the olfactory ascetic formerly known as my fiancé. It would be difficult to re-create or trace the precise trajectory of what transpired, given the panoply of perfumes I now face, the dozens of geometrically unique bottles that grace my boudoir, stored in what from the outside might appear to be a clothing armoire. In a deep, dark corner, hidden in the very back, is a bottle of Oscar, which I have not worn in years, but whose sight still induces a deep feeling of reverence and gratitude for the role that it played in my awakening. No, I no longer wear it—-and it took years to call a halt to the barrage of Oscar bottles with which I was bombarded by my family on the slightest pretext, in their persistent belief that I was still enamored of the scent and that theirs were benevolent interventions. (At one point, I gathered up the unopened gifts and returned them to a department store, offering what must have been a plausible explanation for why I needed to trade them for some other, indeed, any other perfumes.) Today I find Oscar syrupy sweet and viscous, though the mere thought of the scent, etched indelibly in the incredibly resilient receptors in some wondrous part of my brain, still reminds me of the person I once was.

I do not discount sweet viscous perfumes altogether, and indeed am quite fond of some which I believe on some level that I should not like: Amarige, by Givenchy; Mahora, by Guerlain; Il Bacio, by Borghese; Casmir, by Chôpard, and Trésor, by Lancôme, number among the perfumes that I want not to like, generally prefer not to wear, and yet find luscious all the same. This is perhaps easiest to explain in the case of Trésor, with its heady floral top notes of lilac, lily of the valley, and rose; its supporting middle notes of iris and heliotrope; and its solid foundation of sandalwood, musk, amber, vanilla, apricot, and peach. Of the sweet viscous perfumes, only Trésor has enjoyed such enormous popular success that I actually detect it wafting by me on a fairly regular basis, happy for the women whose signature scent it has become—-and that I know why. These are perfumes which, in all of their sweetness, transport me back to my Oscar days, the days of benighted bliss before I discovered the perfection embodied in the floral aldehyde.

The journey was not direct, however, and I tried ever so diligently to become the woman who could and would, indeed should, wear L’heure bleue or Shalimar. These are two of Guerlain’s great solo stars, accompanied of course by an admirable chorus that includes Mitsouko, Nahema, Jicky, and more. The Guerlain creation of which I have emptied the most bottles is Samsara, a relatively new (1989) fragrance (for this venerable old perfumery to royal Europe), whose vanilla base moves it dangerously close to the sweet viscous category, but which is saved by the purity of its top tier (jasmine); the floral simplicity of its middle notes (jasmine, rose, narcissus, violet, orris-—obtained from the roots of the iris); and its foundational complements of sandalwood, tonka, and iris (encore). Samsara is an eminently wearable perfume, to which I return again and again, seeking reprieve from my problematic relationships with L’heure bleue and Shalimar, which I want so ardently to wear, deeply believe deserve to be worn, but tend to reserve for weekends home alone, where their intoxicating seriousness will be shocking to no one but me.

Not all perfumes “serious” in this sense are made by Guerlain, of course. Eau du Soir, by Sisley; Madame Rochas, by Rochas; and Cabochard, by Grès; in addition to Guerlain’s Mitsouko number among those which I admire and occasionally wear, but regard as strictly wintry evening affairs. (Ah, but winters are long and winter days short where I happen to live…) At the other end of the spectrum lies a seeming infinity of “blue” perfumes—inspired by oceans or waterfalls, it seems, and characterized by their weak and insubstantial, flimsy-—literally watery—-nature. The list goes on and on, so there’s no real point in attempting to name them all here. I will say that they often are tinged blue, come in blue bottles, and/or have the word blue or water in their name (for ready identification?), and I infer from the fact that they continue to be produced for mass consumption, that hordes of women prefer scents that do not linger and have very little, if anything, to say. I do not claim that the blues are evil elixirs, but rather that they are not elixirs at all. These are insipid liquids, and, while of a generally innocuous and in some cases even likeable nature, they do not merit the accolade contained within the name perfume. These are fragrances, pure and simple, nothing more and nothing less. (Blue scents are sometimes classified as hesperidic, which is to say, fruity, which is only partly misleading, since fruits contain a very high percentage of water indeed—perhaps even more than human beings.)

As for my own experience with mass-marketed scents, the ones featured in advertisements with tear out “testers” in fashion magazines, I think it’s fair to say that I’ve been around the block (see list below...). I never actually buy bottles of perfume on the basis of the magazine “testers”, not so much because I doubt the capacity of paper to convey its essence-—I always rip open the testers and sniff them out of curiosity, and I may have definitively vetoed some on this basis—-but, rather, because the sorts of scents advertised in magazines are reaching out to a broad swath of consumers who cluster around the midpoint of the bellcurve representing all of the people who appreciate and purchase perfume, and my tastes obviously diverge rather radically from theirs. Scents that scream out “grapefruit” or “baby powder,” for example, are simply not for me. Indeed, I often prefer the men’s versions of the perfumes advertised in magazines. And, no, I have no qualms whatsoever about wearing a great men’s scent, Guerlain’s Vetiver, to name but one.

In thinking about people whose concepts of perfume are determined by extremely vague and inchoate ideas, traces from a more or less incoherent pastiche of cultural influences, I reach naturally for one of my own: the woman in Scorsese’s film Goodfellas (1990), who upon sniffing the bottle of perfume in her friend Janice’s bedroom (Janice is the concubine of the character played by Ray Liotta), nods approvingly and remarks, “French.” I am equally tickled by allusions to perfume when they reveal the identifier’s familiarity with a scent that truly deserves to be remembered and worn in order to be remembered again. Take Al Pacino’s reference to Fleurs de Rocaille, in Scent of a Woman (1992). I admire people in real life who are capable of identifying scents, even if it is only because their significant other has adopted it as her own. I recall with great fondness the day in Home Depot (I was buying new light switch plates for my apartment) when the man in front of me at the check-out line turned around and smiled knowingly as he whispered, “Eternity.”

While they are not my favorites, I will say that Calvin Klein’s works are distinctive creations, which cannot be confused with the run-of-the-mill, dime-a-dozen, throw-away fragrances whose names evaporate from one’s memory as quickly as their scent from the skin. There is a great virtue to memorable perfumes, those which manage to carve out their own unique niche in the infinitely amorphous olfactory Ur-sphere. I am confident that some among them have endured not for the diligence of their marketers, but for the throngs of fans who have formed with them sacred trysts, to love and cherish ‘til death or divorce do they part.

In reflecting upon truly original scents, which cannot be mistaken for anything but precisely what they are, my mind gravitates naturally toward Chanel’s Allure. This linear perfume-—which flouts the reigning tripartite regime with a veritable burst of citrus, mandarin, jasmine, magnolia, honeysuckle, waterlily, vetiver, and vanilla—-is a recent revelation (1996) which I find compelling, though I wish that I did not. Stated starkly: I want not to love a perfume which has been and continues to be marketed into my brain. Still, Chanel’s Allure has a similar effect upon me to that of Peet’s French roast coffee: I keep going back for more. I suspect that the people at Peet’s accomplish their aim with the aid of beakers of white crystalline caffeine sitting in the backroom and ready to shovel into each freshly brewed vat. (Or is it simply that they use robusta in their mix?) As for Allure, I suppose that, beyond its admirable consistency—-as a linear creation, it can be counted upon always and everywhere to deliver the same-—there’s not much to say: Against empty eau de parfum bottles, there can be no defense. Still, the deepest loves are fickle and unpredictable. The objects of such passion are all the more endearing for their defiance of any reasonable expectation. For comfort and stability, Allure will always be there. For profundity and richness that wax and wane in undulating waves, you’re better off with Arpège.

Although I naturally believe myself to have arrived at the family of floral aldehydes through a veridical path leading directly to the ineffable olfactory Truth, in my more pensive moments, I recognize that I have been seduced anew by a range of scents united by what is perhaps most accurately characterized as the sharp scent of soap. Stripping all differences away, this is my reading of the most salient element in Calèche, by Hermès; Arpège, by Lanvin; First, by Van Cleef & Arpels; and, of course, Chanel No. 5. But now a small confession: because of its unfortunate pop-culture associations with Marilyn Monroe and Zsa-Zsa Gabor—-among many others—-I do not in fact wear Chanel No. 5. This is obviously as a good a reason as it would be to avoid Beethoven’s Ninth because of Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange. But there it is, in the arbitrary constellation of associations that constitutes my mind: Green Acres and Chanel No. 5. (A subliminally mortal fear of becoming an Almodóvar protagonist may also drive me away.)

Thanks to the internet, even a woman trapped on a farm can today buy her favorite scents from around the globe. Thanks to modern aviation, it is even possible to travel swiftly to faraway lands, to visit the blessed artists who continue to create ever anew what has become the universe of perfume, a world sadly enjoyed, or even known to exist, by all too few. How many people know that amber is short for ambergris, which in times past was derived from concretions formed in the intestines of sperm whales, but today is primarily produced synthetically? How many have any idea that eau de parfum contains from 15% to 18% of perfume oil, while what is labeled “perfume” contains between 15% and 30%? Perhaps these facts seem as irrelevant to most people as the provenance of civet (a butter-like secretion taken from a pouch under the tail of the civet cat, found in Ethiopia, Burma, and Thailand), castoreum (a creamy, reddish-brown secretion taken from sacs on the beaver), or musk (grains or seeds from a walnut-sized pod removed harmlessly(?) from the male musk deer of the Himalayas) once seemed to me. But times have changed. No longer do I labor under the false belief that the primary, indeed the only, use for bergamot (a citrus which no one dares to eat) is to flavor Earl Gray tea. Today I number among the few who recognize and appreciate bergamot’s true raison d’être: as an essential component in 33% of perfumes.

My ever-deepening love has led me on new adventures in my insatiable quest to learn more and more about the object of my fascination, including a visit to Grasse, France, where I met with real live perfumers, who mix and bottle in-house and sell their creations in small quantities to strange people like me whose lives and armoires have become filled with perfume. I visited the house of Galimard, where I sat at a perfumist’s “organ” stocked with hundreds of glistening glass vials of pure extraits, which I, guided by a professional, combined through a series of stages into my own perfume: Samanthe.

While in Grasse, I also participated in the Concours du Nez, an annual contest to choose the best “nose” for perfume. The competition was more than challenging; it was demoralizing. Could I discern something as subtle as coriander when mixed in with several other elements? In a word: No. I found that identifying a single note in a complex mixture was as difficult for my nose as would be hearing a single voice in a fugue for someone who had never played the piano. Humbled, I returned home, happy in my knowledge of my ignorance, and sure, if of nothing else, that I know what I like. Samanthe now shares the armoire with the stars, and I do own that I derived no small consolation from my discovery, sometime after having returned home, that my creation bears a striking similarity to Bulgari’s Bulgari, which, no, I had never tried before.

Only time will tell how long this floral aldehyde/soap penchant will last, though today it is hard to imagine how anything might shake my faith. But I felt that way for years about Oscar, now firmly woven into the fabric of my past. Will another fortuitous encounter determine a new and profounder object of my affection? These mysteries confound the shrewdest scientist, defy the keenest powers of deduction. Still, one thing is clear: any person who wishes to determine what perfume path I’ll next take will have to begin in my boudoir, replete with beautiful bottles of secret scents, the experience of which gave rise to the traces of base notes that cling to this page.


Connections

The world is a temple where slender spirits
Emit streams of ambiguous signals.
Man there traverses thickets of symbols,
Finding himself, without seeing that he does.

Just as myriad distant echoes merge
To form a single sound, indivisible
As blinding sunlight or the dark of night,
The revelations of the senses become one.

There are simple scents, soft as a baby's bottom,
Verdant as a lush meadow, sonorous as an oboe.
Others are complex, deep intoxicants,

Harboring within them
Amber, chypre, fougère,
The songs of awakened souls.



(sherapop’s translation of Correspondances by Charles Baudelaire,
from Les Fleurs du Mal)


(the above essay was written in January 2007)

More of my writings about perfume can be found at sherapop's salon de parfum:

http://salondeparfum-sherapop.blogspot.com/

I am also now blogging at Il Mondo di Odore:

http://aromierotici.blogspot.com/search/label/sherapop








My signature fragrance

24 Faubourg Hermes
My perfume timeline

My favorite fragrances

Nahema Fracas Attar de Roses Gilded Lily Fleurs de Bulgarie

Perfumes I Have

  • Lanvin Arpege
  • Guerlain Jardins de Bagatelle
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Tiare Mimosa
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Flora Nerolia
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Lavande Velours
  • Guerlain Apres l'Ondee
  • Guerlain Nahema
  • Nina Ricci Deci Dela
  • Guerlain Terracotta Voile d'Ete
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Rosa Magnifica
  • Guerlain Guerlain Chant d'Aromes
  • Guerlain L'Heure Bleue
  • Guerlain Mahora
  • Guerlain Meteorites
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Ylang & Vanille
  • Guerlain Mitsouko Eau de Toilette
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Pamplelune
  • Guerlain L'Instant de Guerlain
  • Guerlain Shalimar
  • Guerlain Samsara Eau de Parfum
  • Robert Piguet Fracas
  • Caron Nuit de Noel
  • Caron Fleurs de Rocaille
  • Jean Patou 1000
  • Rochas Femme Rochas
  • Caron Bellodgia
  • Gianfranco Ferre Ferre eau de parfume
  • Hermes Caleche
  • Fendi Fendi Theorema
  • Dior Dune
  • Sisley Eau du Soir
  • Caron Narcisse Noir
  • The Crown Perfumery Co. Tanglewood Bouquet
  • Marc Jacobs Blush
  • Marc Jacobs Essence
  • Marc Jacobs Marc Jacobs
  • Rochas Madame Rochas
  • Rochas Tocade
  • Bvlgari Bvlgari Pour Femme
  • Gucci Gucci Eau de Parfum
  • Bvlgari Jasmin Noir
  • Boucheron Boucheron
  • Lancome Poeme
  • Boucheron Jaipur Saphir
  • Guerlain Purple Fantasy
  • Fragonard Belle de Nuit
  • Estée Lauder Azuree Pure
  • Van Cleef & Arpels Birmane
  • Marc Jacobs Marc Jacobs Perfume Essence
  • Jean Patou Joy
  • Sarah Jessica Parker Covet
  • Lalique Perles De Lalique
  • Kenzo Kenzo Jungle L'Elephant
  • Pierre Balmain Miss Balmain
  • Pierre Balmain Balmain de Balmain
  • Pierre Balmain Ivoire de Balmain
  • Pierre Balmain Eau d'Ivoire
  • Bond No 9 Chinatown
  • Pierre Balmain Ambre Gris
  • Pierre Balmain Vent Vert
  • Pierre Balmain Eau d'Amazonie de Balmain
  • Pierre Balmain Jolie Madame
  • Pierre Balmain La Mome
  • Pierre Balmain Eau d`Ete de Balmain Summer
  • Estée Lauder White Linen
  • Christian Lacroix Tumulte
  • Lancome Climat (La Collection Fragrances)
  • Lancome Magie (La Collection Fragrances)
  • Lancome Sagamore (La Collection)
  • Lancome Cuir de Lancome (La Collection Fragrances)
  • Fragonard Fragonard
  • Dolce&Gabbana D&G Anthology La Roue de La Fortune 10
  • Yves Saint Laurent Y
  • Sonia Rykiel Belle en Rykiel
  • Van Cleef & Arpels First
  • Comptoir Sud Pacifique Aloha Tiare Eau de Toilette
  • Hanae Mori Haute Couture
  • Bond No 9 Andy Warhol Lexington Avenue
  • Bond No 9 Bryant Park
  • Bond No 9 Eau de Noho
  • Estée Lauder Estee
  • Bond No 9 New York Fling
  • L`Occitane en Provence Organic Certified Lavender Fragrance
  • Bond No 9 Fashion Avenue
  • Bvlgari BLV Notte Pour Femme
  • Carven Ma Griffe
  • Trussardi Trussardi Jeans
  • Laurence Dumont Vanille Violette
  • Pierre Balmain Balmya de Balmain
  • Lalique Flora Bella
  • Perfumer`s Workshop Tea Rose
  • Trussardi Trussardi Inside for women
  • Tom Ford Black Orchid Voile de Fleur
  • Hermes 24 Faubourg
  • Boucheron Trouble
  • Hanae Mori Hanae Mori
  • Trussardi Trussardi Skin
  • Moschino Couture!
  • Bond No 9 Central Park
  • Estée Lauder Youth-Dew
  • Estée Lauder Aliage
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Anisia Bella
  • Creed Love in White
  • Guerlain Jicky
  • Hermes Concentre d`Orange Verte
  • Comptoir Sud Pacifique Sultan Safran
  • Caron Muguet du Bonheur
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Verte Violette
  • Prada Infusion d'Iris
  • Annick Goutal Heure Exquise
  • Parfums DelRae Mythique
  • Infusion Organique Acai Rain
  • Infusion Organique Buddha’s Fig
  • Infusion Organique Sands of Morocco
  • Boucheron Jeweler Boucheron Edition - Boucheron Eau de Parfum
  • Hermes Amazone
  • Versace Blonde
  • Van Cleef & Arpels Oriens
  • Cerruti Image Woman
  • Borsari Violetta di Parma
  • Galimard Lapis Lazuli
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Cherry Blossom
  • Lolita Lempicka Fleur Defendue
  • Bond No 9 Nuits de Noho
  • Boucheron Miss Boucheron
  • Lancome Sikkim (La Collection Fragrances)
  • Bond No 9 Eau de New York
  • Cerruti 1881
  • Fragonard Zizanie
  • Caron Aimez - Moi
  • Caron Montaigne
  • Henri Bendel Rose & Oud
  • Henri Bendel Incense & Musk
  • AA Absolument Absinthe Absolument Absinthe
  • Anne Pliska Anne Pliska
  • Yves Rocher Iris Noir
  • Yves Rocher Voile d'Ambre
  • Yves Rocher Rose Absolue
  • Jean Charles Brosseau Ombre Rose L'Original
  • Jean Charles Brosseau Fleurs d`Ombre Violette - Menthe
  • L`Occitane en Provence Miel & Citron Pailletee Shimmering
  • L`Occitane en Provence Ruban d'Orange
  • Lolita Lempicka L de Lolita Lempicka
  • Lolita Lempicka Coral Flower
  • Fresh Citron de Vigne
  • La Perla La Perla
  • Etro Royal Pavillon
  • Lalique Encre Noire Pour Elle
  • Lalique Encre Noire
  • Boucheron Boucheron Eau Legere
  • Houbigant Quelques Fleurs l`Original
  • Mauboussin Histoire d`Eau
  • Fresh Cannabis Rose
  • Fresh Index Pink Jasmine
  • Antica Farmacista Magnolia, Orchid & Mimosa
  • Fresh Cannabis Santal
  • Comme des Garcons Comme des Garcons Series 3 Incense: Kyoto
  • Comme des Garcons Comme des Garcons Series 3 Incense: Zagorsk
  • Comme des Garcons Comme des Garcons
  • Guy Laroche Fidji
  • Annick Goutal Grand Amour
  • Lolita Lempicka Lolita Lempicka
  • Ellen Tracy Tracy
  • Thierry Mugler Angel Garden Of Stars - Violette Angel
  • Thierry Mugler Angel Garden Of Stars - La Rose Angel
  • Thierry Mugler Angel Garden Of Stars - Le Lys
  • Fresh Brown Sugar
  • Annick Goutal Quel Amour!
  • Hermes Eau D`Orange Verte
  • Fresh Hesperides
  • Prada Infusion d`Homme
  • Bond No 9 The Scent Of Peace
  • Ineke Angel’s Trumpet
  • Ineke Scarlet Larkspur
  • Ineke After My Own Heart
  • Ineke Briar Rose
  • Ineke Poet’s Jasmine
  • Ineke Gilded Lily
  • Donna Karan Donna Karan Gold
  • DSQUARED² She Wood
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Drole de Rose
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Voleur de Roses
  • Lolita Lempicka Eau de Desir
  • Thierry Mugler A*Men
  • Thierry Mugler Eau de Star
  • Annick Goutal Eau d'Hadrien
  • Annick Goutal Petite Cherie
  • Annick Goutal La Violette
  • Prada Infusion d`Iris Eau de Toilette
  • Moschino Toujours Glamour
  • Moschino Moschino Funny!
  • Floris White Rose
  • MOR Garden of Hespera
  • Floris Night Scented Jasmine
  • Badgley Mischka Badgley Mischka
  • St. John St. John Eau de Parfum
  • Molinard Les Fleurs: Violette
  • Floris Snow Rose
  • Van Cleef & Arpels Feerie
  • Kenzo Kenzo Vintage Edition
  • Rochas Absolu
  • Jean Desprez Bal a Versailles
  • Emanuel Ungaro Diva
  • Alexander McQueen My Queen
  • Lolita Lempicka Lolita Lempicka Au Masculin
  • MOR Freia
  • Le Labo Bouquet Blanc
  • Le Labo Poudre D’Orient
  • Le Labo Belle Du Soir
  • Le Labo Chant De Bois
  • Le Labo Orange Discrete
  • Lalique Lalique Le Parfum
  • Bond No 9 Cooper Square
  • Bond No 9 Harrods Rose
  • Bond No 9 Washington Square
  • Bond No 9 I Love New York for All
  • Bond No 9 West Side
  • Hanae Mori Hanae Mori N01
  • Kenzo 5:40 pm in Madagascar
  • Yves Rocher Tendre Jasmin
  • Acqua di Parma Acqua di Parma Iris Nobile Edizione Speciale 2008
  • La Prairie Life Threads Platinum
  • Caron Parfum Sacre
  • Caron Le 3` Homme de Caron
  • Bvlgari Rose Essentielle
  • Moschino Glamour
  • Kenzo 7:15 am in Bali
  • Lalique Le Baiser
  • Jean Patou Sira des Indes
  • Queen Latifah Queen of Hearts
  • Comme des Garcons Comme des Garcons Series 3 Incense: Avignon
  • Calvin Klein Euphoria
  • Givenchy Very Irresistible Givenchy L’Intense
  • Prada Prada Amber Pour Homme (Prada Man)
  • Comme des Garcons Comme des Garcons Series 3 Incense: Jaisalmer
  • Comme des Garcons Comme des Garcons Series 3 Incense: Ouarzazate
  • La Perla Eclix
  • Le Couvent des Minimes Eau des Minimes Cologne
  • Juicy Couture Juicy Couture
  • Juicy Couture Dirty English for Men
  • Prada Infusion de Fleur d'Oranger
  • Prada Infusion de Tubereuse
  • Tokyo Milk Parfumarie Curiosite Dead Sexy
  • Miller Harris Citron Citron
  • Hermes Eau des Merveilles
  • Hermes L’Ambre des Merveilles
  • Miller Harris Fleurs de Bois
  • Prada Prada (Amber)
  • Le Couvent des Minimes Fleur d`Oranger
  • Miller Harris Figue Amere
  • Miller Harris Terre de Bois
  • Miller Harris Feuilles de Tabac
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Traversee du Bosphore
  • Miller Harris Coeur de Fleur
  • Gianfranco Ferre Gianfranco Ferre
  • Miller Harris Geranium Bourbon
  • Miller Harris En Sens Du Bois
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Mimosa Pour Moi
  • Krizia Krazy Krizia
  • Caron Infini
  • Gianfranco Ferre GFF Donna
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Coeur de Vetiver Sacre
  • Histoires de Parfums 1804
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Timbuktu
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Bois Farine
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur L'Eau de L'Artisan
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Havana Vanille (Vanille Absolument)
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Fou d`Absinthe
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Fleur de Liane
  • Prada Prada Tendre
  • Guerlain Eau de Cologne Imperiale
  • Frederic Malle Lipstick Rose
  • Parfums Berdoues Violettes de Toulouse Eau de Toilette
  • Miller Harris Fleur Oriental
  • Histoires de Parfums Blanc Violette
  • Histoires de Parfums 1873
  • Prada Infusion de Vetiver
  • Van Cleef & Arpels Feerie Eau de Toilette
  • Parfums de Nicolaï Cologne Cedrat
  • Bond No 9 H.O.T. Always
  • Bond No 9 New York Oud
  • Bond No 9 Nouveau Bowery
  • Bond No 9 Chelsea Flowers
  • Bond No 9 Little Italy
  • Bond No 9 Harrods for Her
  • Marc Jacobs Marc Jacobs Splash Fig
  • Marc Jacobs Marc Jacobs Splash Gardenia
  • Bond No 9 Bleecker Street
  • Bond No 9 New York Amber
  • Providence Perfume Co. Osmanthus Oolong
  • Cartier Eau de Cartier Concentree
  • Cartier Eau de Cartier Essence d`Orange
  • Parfums Berdoues Violette Divine
  • Parfums de Nicolaï Petit Ange
  • Mauboussin Mauboussin Pour Elle
  • Happ & Stahns 1922 Lily Sanguine
  • Leonard Leonara
  • Mauboussin Mauboussin Homme
  • Elizabeth W Magnolia
  • Tocca Violette
  • Miller Harris Noix de Tubereuse
  • Moschino Cheap and Chic Hippy Fizz
  • Etat Libre d`Orange Divin`Enfant
  • Etat Libre d`Orange Putain des Palaces
  • Miller Harris L`Air de Rien
  • Nejma Nejma 2
  • Nejma Nejma 4
  • Nejma Nejma 3
  • Nejma Nejma 6
  • Nejma Nejma 5
  • DSH Perfumes Tubereuse
  • Molinard Molinard Homme II
  • Pierre Balmain Monsieur Balmain
  • Parfums DelRae Debut
  • Sonoma Scent Studio Rose Musc
  • Miller Harris Jasmin Vert
  • Creed Love in Black
  • Tauer Perfumes 06 Incense Rose
  • Keiko Mecheri Attar de Roses
  • Van Cleef & Arpels Van Cleef
  • Borsari Aqua Classica di Parma
  • Hermes Rouge Hermes
  • Guerlain Chamade
  • Maitre Parfumeur et Gantier Iris Bleu Gris
  • Acqua di Parma Acqua di Parma Gelsomino Nobile
  • Creed Fleurs de Bulgarie
  • Keiko Mecheri Iris d`Argent
  • Miller Harris Coeur d`Ete
  • Creed Tubereuse Indiana
  • Creed Imperatrice Eugenie
  • Creed Irisia
  • Keiko Mecheri Fleur de Peau
  • Annick Goutal Gardenia Passion
  • Estée Lauder Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia
  • Annick Goutal Le Mimosa
  • Annick Goutal Les Nuits d'Hadrien
  • Kiehl`s Aromatic Blends: Fig Leaf & Sage
  • Kiehl`s Aromatic Blends: Vanilla & Cedarwood
  • Kiehl`s Aromatic Blends: Nashi Blossom & Pink Grapefruit
  • Prada Prada Amber Pour Homme Intense
  • Prada L`Eau Ambree
  • Lolita Lempicka Illusions Noires Le Premier Parfum Eau de Minuit
  • Creed Jasmin Imperatrice Eugenie
  • Anthropologie A Rather Novel Collection Taverns & The Hague by Caroline Sabas
  • Anthropologie A Rather Novel Collection 5 O'Clock At Belvoir Castle by Stephen Nilsen
  • Anthropologie A Rather Novel Collection Hamarikyu Gardens by Marypierre
  • Anthropologie A Rather Novel Collection Cape Of Good Hope by Claude Dir
  • DSQUARED² She Wood Golden Light Wood
  • Clinique Aromatics Elixir
  • Juliette Has A Gun Vengeance Extreme
  • Comptoir Sud Pacifique Bois De Filao
  • Penhaligon`s Amaranthine
  • Penhaligon`s LP No:9
  • Creed Fleurissimo
  • Keiko Mecheri Isles Lointaines
  • Molinard Les Fleurs: Ambre
  • Montale Powder Flowers
  • Agua de Sevilla Agua de Naranjos
  • Agua de Sevilla Agua de Lavanda
  • Guerlain Mayotte
  • Molinard Les Orientaux: Vanille
  • Molinard Les Orientaux: Patchouli
  • Gandini 1896 Blue Musk
  • Hermes Eau de Gentiane Blanche
  • Prada Infusion de Rose
  • Aveda Chakra 3 Equipoise
  • Lavanila Laboratories Vanilla Blossom
  • Molinard Les Orientaux: Vanille Patchouli
  • Keiko Mecheri Cuir Cordoba
  • Keiko Mecheri Iris Pourpre
  • Keiko Mecheri Mihime
  • Demeter Fragrance Rose
  • Diptyque Eau de Lierre
  • Lalique Amethyst
  • Lolita Lempicka Lolita Lempicka L'Eau en Blanc
  • Le Couvent des Minimes Cologne of Love
  • Yves Rocher Secret d`Essences Neroli
  • Natori Natori
  • Moschino Moschino
  • Molinard Les Fleurs: Jasmin
  • Sama Loup des Steppes
  • Sama Ambre Rose
  • Sama Jardin d'Iris
  • Sama Deva des Fleurs
  • Lolita Lempicka Illusions Noires Au Masculin Eau de Minuit
  • Yosh Angelino
  • Yosh Sea Ranch
  • Yosh Zuma
  • Hermes Eau Claire des Merveilles
  • Yosh Montelena
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur Nuit de Tubereuse
  • Tocca Brigitte
  • Elizabeth W Vetiver
  • Etat Libre d`Orange Josephine Baker
  • Guerlain Shalimar Eau De Cologne
  • Montale Aoud Rose Petals
  • Van Cleef & Arpels Murmure

Perfumes I Want

  • Guerlain Parure
  • Guerlain Aroma Allegoria Aromaparfum Apaisant
  • Victoria`s Secret Dream Angels Divine
  • Banana Republic Rosewood
  • Banana Republic Black Walnut
  • Guerlain Coriolan
  • Guerlain Vol de Nuit
  • Dior Miss Dior
  • Dior Diorissimo
  • Dior Diorella
  • Dior Cruise Collection - Escale a Portofino
  • Laurence Dumont Figue Sauvage
  • Chanel Les Exclusifs de Chanel Sycomore
  • Chanel Les Exclusifs de Chanel 31 Rue Cambon
  • Creed Acqua Fiorentina
  • Creed Tabarome
  • Creed Chevrefeuille
  • Cristobal Balenciaga Le Dix Perfume
  • Penhaligon`s Violetta
  • Estée Lauder Private Collection Jasmin White Moss
  • Molinard Eau de Citrus
  • Robert Piguet Bandit
  • Penhaligon`s Lily & Spice
  • L`Artisan Parfumeur La Chasse aux Papillons Extreme
  • Asprey London Purple Water
  • Tom Ford White Patchouli
  • Hermes Terre d'Hermes
  • Versace White Jeans
  • Omnia Profumo Ambra
  • Fendi Theorema Esprit d`Ete
  • Esteban Cuir
  • Dior La Collection Couturier Parfumeur Mitzah
  • CnR Create Leo
  • Cristobal Balenciaga Talisman
  • Cacharel Eden
  • Hermes Hermessence Ambre Narguile
  • Il Profvmo Osmo Scents Patchouli Noir
  • Juliette Has A Gun Midnight Oud
  • Donna Karan Chaos
  • Sonoma Scent Studio Winter Woods
  • Sonoma Scent Studio Ambre Noir
  • Sonoma Scent Studio Voile de Violette
  • Frederic Malle L'Eau d'Hiver
  • Hermes Hermessence Iris Ukiyoé
  • Thierry Mugler Alien Liqueur de Parfum
  • Michael Storer Yvette
  • Acqua di Parma Profumo Eau de Parfum
  • Czech & Speake Dark Rose
  • Xerjoff Dhajala
  • Miller Harris La Fumee
  • Nejma Puro Intense
  • Miller Harris Terre d'Iris
  • Serge Lutens Bois de Violette
  • Montale Attar
  • Lush Imogen Rose
  • Creed Spring Flower
  • Creed Original Santal
  • Hermes Elixir des Merveilles
  • Tom Ford Black Violet
  • Les Parfums de Rosine Secrets de Rose
  • Montale Deep Roses
  • Montale Jasmine Full
  • Montale Oriental Flowers
  • Kerosene Copper Skies
  • Etat Libre d`Orange Fils de Dieu du riz et des agrumes
  • Lolita Lempicka Midnight Couture Black Eau de Minuit
  • DSH Perfumes L´eau d´Iris
  • Providence Perfume Co. Cocoa Tuberose
  • House of Matriarch oM
  • DSH Perfumes Mimosa
  • Illuminum Rose Oud
  • House of Matriarch En Tendre

Perfumes I Had

  • Chanel Allure eau de parfum
  • Lancome Tresor
  • Salvatore Ferragamo Salvatore Ferragamo pour Femme
  • Tokyo Milk Parfumarie Curiosite Arsenic
  • Tokyo Milk Parfumarie Curiosite Tainted Love
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Gentiana
  • Carthusia Fiori di Capri
  • Calvin Klein Obsession
  • Jean Patou Sublime
  • Bath and Body Works Japanese Cherry Blossom
  • Yves Saint Laurent Yvresse (Champagne)
  • Bath and Body Works Vanilla Noir
  • Bath and Body Works Black Amethyst
  • Estée Lauder Intuition
  • Clinique Clinique Happy
  • The Body Shop Cassis Rose
  • Bath and Body Works Velvet Tuberose
  • Ralph Lauren Ralph Lauren Blue
  • Guerlain Vetiver
  • Cacharel Noa Fleur
  • Calvin Klein CK One
  • Guerlain Insolence
  • Calvin Klein Truth
  • Jean Couturier Coriandre
  • Givenchy Amarige
  • Yves Saint Laurent Paris
  • Bvlgari BLV
  • Calvin Klein Eternity
  • Givenchy Fleur d'Interdit
  • Ralph Lauren Safari
  • Comptoir Sud Pacifique Vanille Mokha
  • Ralph Lauren Pure Turquoise
  • Elizabeth Arden Sunflowers
  • Escada Escada
  • Escada Escada Acte 2
  • Coty Emeraude
  • Coty Muguet de Bois
  • Gai Mattiolo Gai Mattiolo
  • Guerlain Aqua Allegoria Mentafollia
  • Giorgio Armani Gio
  • Jean Patou Enjoy
  • Gres Cabotine Bleu
  • Donna Karan Cashmere Mist
  • Givenchy Organza
  • Isabella Rossellini Manifesto
  • Lanvin Oxygene
  • Rochas Lumiere
  • Worth Je Reviens
  • Lancome Aroma Calm
  • Lanvin Rumeur
  • Lancome Aroma Tonic
  • Lancome O Oui!
  • Memo Inlé
  • Estée Lauder White Linen Breeze
  • Bob Mackie Perhaps
  • Chanel Coco Mademoiselle Parfum
  • Chanel Coco
  • Chanel Chanel N°19
  • Pierre Balmain BalMan
  • Bond No 9 Hamptons
  • Caron Fleur de Rocaille (1993)
  • Tokyo Milk Parfumarie Curiosite Crushed
  • Aveda Chakra 1 Motivation
  • Dior Eau Svelte
  • Aveda Chakra 6 Intuition

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