Columns Leaving Your Fragrant Comfort Zone: Iris, Violet and Other Blue Smells

Leaving Your Fragrant Comfort Zone: Iris, Violet and Other Blue Smells

01/26/17 11:18:04 (37 comments)

by: John Biebel, Dr. Marlen Elliot Harrison

Not long ago Fragrantica writers challenged each other to leave their comfort zones with perfumes that fall into categories that they traditionally didn’t like. For example, read the first in this series by Fragrantica editors Bella van der Weerd and Yi Shang: Leaving Your Fragrant Comfort Zone - Powdery and White Floral Scents.

PART 1 BY JOHN BIEBEL

Fragrantica writers communicated about our own “difficult notes,” and I had to think for a minute. I tend to have very few perfume scents that are no-nos for me, but then it loomed large in my memory: Iris. Violet. Those scents that I generally refer to as Blue Flowers or Blue Smells. This is the toughest scent family for me to embrace and has never been a big winner on my skin.

Blue watercolor

Irises were a great love for my father. He was a landscaper and he took great pride in the plants around us. I distinctly remember a large clump of deep purple-blue irises near our garage door that were amazing to behold in mid-spring each year. Yet, irises do not have much of a natural smell. Of course, their tubers or rhizomes contain a vital perfumery component, but there’s always been a disconnect to me between that orris smell and the flower itself. Perhaps it’s just that my brain doesn’t connect the two together.

It’s similar with violets. In New England, where I was raised in the US, the violets here grow almost like weeds and tend to overtake a garden in a month or so. They are also without scent. They are not like the parma violets of Europe with their delicate sweetness. Here, the common garden violet has no smell. Our only point of reference for violets is Choward’s Violet Mints. When I first started smelling violets in perfumes, it was a bit alien to me.

Chowards Violet Mints

I did, back in the early 00’s, have a bottle of Lanvin’s Arpège Pour Homme, one of the most iris-y of iris fragrances for men. I recall that I enjoyed wearing it, but my next purchase was Guerlain’s Vetiver, and I made an abrupt transition into deeper, less sweet realms of scent. My feelings about iris were verified when I found myself at Neiman Marcus in San Francisco a few years ago. Houbigant had just released the much talked-about Iris des Champs. Although it certainly wasn’t unpleasant to smell (and it’s a beautifully designed bottle and label) I couldn’t get past that strange smell of wet paper; those ionones that can bring about a certain pulpy, mushy smell that sums up iris for me. It seemed like a hopeless cause.

Irises at Night

But all of this changed when I received three perfume samples from Fragrantica Managing Editor Dr. Marlen E. Harrison. He’d decided he was going to try to change this relationship problem I was having with iris and the “blue flowers.” I welcomed the opportunity, and not long after, a package of samples arrived with an intriguing bag of three vials marked A, B, and C. 

Iris Perfume A

When I opened the vial, I was surprised. “This smells rather nice,” I said. The first whiff is bright, energetic, a little bit playful. It bears a slight resemblance to the opening of Caron’s Pour un Homme in that lavender/vanilla way. Very soon, however, the top notes evaporate on my skin and I can detect the α-ionones and β-ionones (those violet components) and they can be pleasant or not for me, depending on what they’re mixed with. Here, they are slightly creamy, a bit of the rougher edges taken off. As it dries down, it feels less playful and more of a breezy, pale musk.

I can say that I’m learning something about these blue-flower perfumes - they do convey a particular kind of mood, temperature, time of day. It’s hard to imagine foul weather or wintry winds when you’re smelling iris and violet. They do embody a lot of sunshine and spring. This perfume is a perfect example, it has gentle sweetness like freshly mown grass or picked flowers. 

Overall, I would say that I do like this perfume. It remains somewhat light and I may need to adjust my expectations to less prominent base notes, but the floral aspects are on that nice medium of not too pretty and not too dry. It’s a unisex bouquet with a hint of greenery. The dry down retains the brightness from the beginning (one of the nicer aspects of this perfume.)

Iris Perfume B

Now this is interesting! What is this curious smell? Because I don’t have the guide of notes or text here, I’m working from scent impressions, but it’s a very complex, thick aromatic perfume. What do I detect on first sniff? A whole host of interesting nuances: mild herbal-aromatics, something akin to green-and-sweet (like artemesia or tarragon…), that vanilla-like heliotrope, a darker aspect possibly vetiver or sandalwood. Altogether it is velvety, with a middle that evokes wood and ferns and a slightly sour bit of spices, something like fenugreek to my nose.

As the hour passes, the scent calms down slightly and takes on a more vanilla character; or more specifically, a vanilla/heliotrope and woody base. It is more traditional in its dry down, like a light-blue flavored amber. Pleasant, but not as exciting as the opening. Overall though I would say that I enjoy this perfume and I’m extremely curious about what’s inside it.

Iris Perfume C

This fragrance is extremely different from the previous two. My first thoughts? Very modern, very iris/violet, some aroma chemicals that imply freshness, a touch of hyacinth (particularly grape hyacinth, that extremely fragrant deeply purple bulb flower with the super saturated blossoms.) The indolic aspects of hyacinth are here - that slightly animalic “off” smell that one can detect in jasmine and perfumes like Jean Patou’s Joy. It’s rather compelling here. 

This is a fragrance that asks the nose to breathe deeply and interpret and experience. There are many things happening here. Floral, lily, spring flowers, a pastel palette, dark undertones, smells of costus and elemi-like citrus. If this is iris, it’s a cool and somewhat metallic one - a bit frost-bound. In this regard, it’s utterly different from the previous samples. It “feels” the most modern, and has an intriguing take on the notion of iris. When some of the top dries off, it is a drier, more skin-friendly floral - definitely not sweet. 

My final impression is that I respect it, and could see myself wearing this in springtime; it’s got a certain medicinal/plasticity to it that I find interesting. I would wear it occasionally when I want a bracing, cool floral scent.

Pale Irises

Samples in Summary:

What most surprises me is that iris/violet is a far more versatile component than I thought. Here were three very different compositions, with different “feels” to them, a very broad range from floral to industrial. There is something about the way the blue flowers mix with amber elements and green elements that intrigues me. They seem like two natural combinations.  So What I may have learned here is that there is a particular slant on the blue flowers that's better suited to me. Of the three samples, I think that either 2 or 3 would suit me, probably #2 being my favorite of the bunch for that wild opening. I wonder what they could be?

Parma Violets

PART 2 BY MARLEN HARRISON

One of the most enjoyable aspects of being a perfume lover is sharing what we're passionate about. In a conversation with John Biebel about aromas he doesn't particularly care for, I was surprised to learn that blue flowers of iris and violet were problematic for him. I didn't become an iris lover until late in my fragrance career and I'm still not a violet fan. It is always interesting to learn the fragrant inclinations of our friends. However, present me with an olfactory challenge and I'm eager to meet it; I could certainly offer John some alternative iris fragrances to illustrate the range of possibilities of the perfumer's palette.

Parfum Satori Iris Homme

Fragrance A was described by John as "bright, energetic, a little bit playful." Developed by Japan's master perfumer, Satori Osawa, in 2010, Iris Homme has  top notes of lemon, cardamom and orange blossom; middle notes of iris, violet and jasmine; and base notes of amber, sandalwood and musk. I earlier reviewed it here: Gender Bender: The World of a Japanese Perfumer Part 2, Satori Osawa's Iris Homme.

Iris homme is first and foremost an iris fragrance but is indeed supported by airy violet and pale skin musk. John's description above perfectly embodies my own feelings about Iris Homme. Culture certainly influences esthetics of aroma and the Japanese assuredly appreciate understated, gentle aromas that don't invite too much attention. Fragrance is a pleasure for oneself and Iris Homme offers a tender, contemplative skin scent (after a surprisingly strong opening) of citrus notes caressing fresh florals on a base of soft woods and musk. I figured this would contrast strongly with the European fragrances that I selected as the other two samples.

Prada Infusion d'Iris Absolue

Heading in a slightly different, Oriental direction, with much richer basenotes, I selected Prada's Infusion d'Iris Eau de Parfum Absolue as Fragrance B and John seems to have really taken to this interpretation/setting for iris. Created by Daniela (Roche) Andrier in 2012, this warm, ambery flanker to the classic, greener Infusion d'Iris includes notes of exotic Tunisian neroli, orange blossom, iris from Florence, mastic, benzoin from Laos, tonka bean from Venezuela, Madagascar vanilla and white musk. John wrote that "As the hour passes, the scent calms down slightly and takes on a more vanilla character; or more specifically, a vanilla/heliotrope and woody base."

Absolue strays from the fresh, greener nuances of iris and instead capitalizes on the doughy, powdery aspects of orris root with a hefty dose of sweet orange flower in the topnotes and powdery musk and resins in the base. It stands in stark contrast to the violet-tinged freshness of Parfum Satori's Iris Homme.

Hermes Hiris

The final fragrance, Fragrance C, that I chose for John was Olivia Giacobetti's 1999 masterpiece Hiris from Hermes. Whereas Satori's take is a subtle watercolor painting and Prada's Absolue is a bold, gilded oil painting, Giacobetti's take combines both the bright floral aspects of traditional iris scents with the earthy, doughiness of the roots to create an impressionist creation. Hiris feels more like an olfactory representation of the flower and its bulb compared to Satori's interpretation of iris and Prada's utilization of iris as a note in a composition. Hermes offers, "From the flower to the fragrance, that is the rarefied, modern intention of Hiris, an utterly original single-flower perfume devoted to the splendour of irises and dedicated to women. A perfume of emotion and subtlety conceived by Olivia Giacobetti, this novel uses infinite delicacy to express the shifting charms – sometimes floral, sometimes powdery or vegetal – of one of nature’s olfactory marvels." Hiris contains notes of iris, neroli, coriander, hay, rose, ambrette seed, almond wood, cedar, honey and vanilla.

John wrote, "If this is iris, it’s a cool and somewhat metallic one - a bit frost-bound. In this regard, it’s utterly different from the previous samples. It “feels” the most modern, and has an intriguing take on the notion of iris." I couldn't agree more: it is far less conventional and not quite as straightforward as the other two. The woody notes along with the iris, ambrette and vanilla create a surprisingly yeasty baked bread accord that wafts throughout the development. Absolutely fascinating!

I enjoy all three of the iris fragrances I selected and am glad that John might just have been converted to being someone interested in exploring other iris aromas. And there are so many beautiful scents to choose from; I could easily have sent him 30 samples rather than just 3. Perhaps we'll need to do a group Best in Show to fully showcase the splendor of the inspirational blue flowers. Now, can anyone convert us to violet-lovers?

What's your take on blue flowers? Do you have a favorite iris aroma?

 

John Biebel

John Biebel is an editor for Fragrantica living and working in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. He began writing for the site in 2011. He holds a degree in Fine Art from The Cooper Union in New York City and works as a software application designer and a painter. He began his own indie perfume venture, January Scent Project, in 2015. He has a particular love for perfume history, the chemical composition of perfumes, and interviewing perfumers when he travels. He writes two recurring columns: From the Forums, and Perfume in Technology. In the world of fragrances, John has a great personal attachment to certain classic perfume types like fougères and chypres, men's scents of the barbershop type, rose perfumes, and the perfumes of Serge Lutens.

Marlen Harrison

Dr. Marlen Elliot Harrison’s journalism in the fragrance industry has appeared in international print and online publications such as PlayboyMen’s JournalMen’s Health and the New York Times. Marlen is also a regular contributor to BeautyAlmanac.com and works as a graduate professor, thesis advisor and faculty supervisor for MA programs in TESOL, Education, Writing and Literature. Learn more about Marlen by visiting www.MarlenHarrison.com.

 

 

 



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stelladoro
stelladoro

Any recommendations for people who find rose fragrances difficult? Am I the only one in that category? The only two rose fragrances that I own are Chopard's Rose Malaki and Tauer's Rose du Khanduhar.

Feb
11
2017
stelladoro
stelladoro

Got B and C but wasn't familiar with A. I generally don't like floral scents, which to my disappointment was what I found Prada's Infusion de Iris Absolue to be. Also too powdery for me. I love vegetal scents which aren't that popular among women. Heeley' Nuit de Iris starts out with that wet sweet iris that takes my breath away then hides and plays peek-a-boo during it's long lived presence. Serge Lutens 'Iris Silver Mist' is my all time favorite Iris fragrance. I find it's dryness and the comparatively sweet iris it settles into quiet and calming. Loved the article! Love Hermes' Hiris in the summer for its freshness and Caron's Violettes Precieux for warm weather. As for Silver Iris, I'm of the opinion that sugary sweet Iris, violets and incense will never come to a good end.

Feb
11
2017
kati77
kati77

I have an excellent example of perfume leaving comfort zone that will make Mr Biebel look from another point of view to it.
Violetta di Parma by Borsari.
And anyone i recommend to try. I opened my "nose" wider to iris after this one.

Feb
10
2017
scarlett.angel
scarlett.angel

Love violet and iris. Some are difficult to wear, such as Tom Ford Violet Blonde. I prefer something sweeter; floral but not candy like. Still searching for that perfect scent!

Feb
10
2017
jennifer60656
jennifer60656

The much maligned Grey Flannel and Fahrenheit are two of my most favorite violet fragrances. I can't think of any feminine violets that really do it for me. I love powdery Iris perfumes in general.

Feb
09
2017
rostov14
rostov14

"Green violets with the aspect of crushed violet leaves on a shady forest clearing..." Would suggest to anticipate this violet lyrics from Dsquared2 She Wood Velvet Forest Wood or Trussardi's Skin.

Powdery vintage iris you could find in Iris Ysatis by Givenchy.
Smell with distinction, indeed.
The best iris-violet tandem show by My Queen, Alexander McQueen.
Love the article!Thank you.

Feb
09
2017
rickyrebarco
rickyrebarco

I love, love iris and violet notes in perfumes. Favorites are Heeley's Iris de Nuit, Ramon Monegal's Impossible Iris and Prada Purple Rain. Violet, Caron's Aimez-Moi is a gorgeous one that I love. Eric Buterbaugh's Violet is also a great unisex one.

Jan
29
2017
johngreenink
johngreenink

I wanted to say thanks for all the reader feedback, I've learned a lot from your experiences with Iris and Violet. You've given me some more perfumes to try out now, too! The format of the article is indeed a great way to experience perfumes without the "crutch" of preconception. I think it keeps our noses more attuned and curious this way. I found it to be a very rewarding way to get to know an area of smells that I was not very familiar with; it sounds like some of you could replicate the same with your friends; what a cool undertaking!

Jan
29
2017
Betsywoolbright
Betsywoolbright

I didn't read all the comments, but I will say that I've lived my entire life in the Northwest US. The irises we have here stink! Almost acrid, with a very vegetal, almost rottenness. No experience with the root. But due to this, I was Very Leery of Iris note when I first embarked on my perfume journey. I'm finding that there is no resemblance between that dry, somewhat earthy note I've come to love, and those terrible flowers of late spring.
As for Violets, when I was a kid, my mom had some dusting powder. When I see descriptions of Parma violets, or violet candy, I imagine her powder smelled like that. I have smelled wild violets which have that same basic smell, and which is present in Lolita Lempicka and Bvlgari Blv II.

Jan
29
2017
Planet_X
Planet_X

This is an interesting structure for the article, very enjoyable reading, - I think it is also "innovative" approach, how to come closer towards misunderstood by your chemistry notes. I will try to do same with few friends of mine, who hate certain flowers, we shall see who will give up eventually.
Myself I have a difficulties with tuberose, gardenia and jasmine, OK with iris, adore rose and developing fascination with the violets at last!)
My personal best violets WITH iris - John Galliano EDP, iris - L`eau de Minuit Lolita Lempicka and few others of Lempicka, violets - Ultraviolet Paco Rabanne, - all those named are full of fantasy world, fairy-tale and romance)

Jan
29
2017
PerfumeEmpress
PerfumeEmpress

I love both scents: violet and iris.

My favorite iris is Narciso Rodriguez' Essence. I call it my 'cold' scent because that's exactly how the initial spritz always feels. I LOVE to wear it in summer.

I'm still searching for a good violet scent.

Jan
28
2017
odoro
odoro

Violets - these and pansies were my first flower loves. Violets were the first flowers I picked to bring home
.
They come in two varieties.
- Those you mentioned, smooth petals and stems, colored blue, blue and white or mostly white.
Those grown in lawns do have scent if you get to them just as the dew dries and before the sun evaporates the VOCs. It is very light and slightly green sweet. As you pick the bouquet bury your nose in it as you go because by the time you get it home the scent has vanished from the heat of you hand just from being held.
If you pick them from a shaded wooded area, those hold the scent through the day until picked (as above).
- Field violets are fuzzy stemmed, short and usually all purple. By the time of day I got to them, they were scentless. (Had to wait for cows to move on...)

The smooth violets make a lovely, lightly scented, drinkable spring tonic. 1oz - 10/12 oz cool water. (Skip the lemon the recipe calls for. It never lasts long enough to need it!)

Parma violets - tried this once in scent. Not for me. Just not what I remembered.

Since I quite like powdery scents, iris is definitely in many of mine. The flowers I prefer to leave in the garden for all to enjoy until it is time to remove the spent blooms.

Now, if we're talking lavender, another blue/purple, it has to have real EOs. That is a flat out favorite. Thankfully there are companies out there who use the real oils in their products.

Jan
28
2017
VanillaTabbyCat1963
VanillaTabbyCat1963

Mr.Beibel; Dr. Harrison: I loved reading this article. It makes me think about how notes that might draw in some, repel others. That is interesting because it points towards understanding how we develop differing tastes and opinions.

I like that I can try and understand why some folks don't care for a scent group- in this case blue-purple flowers. It's interesting when you find out that they possibly dislike something for the same reason I like it.

It's true that in New England Violet have an undetectable scent, but I was so fascinated to find that they do in Europe, that I fell hard for anything Violet. As Iris is often paired with Violet, I fell for it's sweet parsnip like pairing, for much the same reason I love Heliotrope.

For some time my favorite perfumes were those with purple notes, as in L' Heure Bleue, Oscar Lite, Lou Lou. Other florals have since become my passion including White Florals, Yellow Florals and sometimes Red Rose as in it's ultimate formula, Joy,

Jan
28
2017
Fragrant Desert
Fragrant Desert

LoVe for Iris right here. Everywhere from Chanel's N 19 Poudre to Hermes Hiris and manymany stops in between like Bijan's Nude for women, L'Interdit or even Eau De Glow by JLO. Flower or root! Don't know about Violet so much? Prada's Infusion d'Iris.. my goshness, for a moment there if Iris was a top or second top note into my cart it went! Some can bug me lately with powdery accords but I still love my Apres L'Ondee and a few other Guerlain which feature iris. I feel like getting a giant photo or painting of an iris flower for my home.

Jan
28
2017
Sherihan
Sherihan

Violet note in perfumery is extracted from the green leaf (on the stem), not the purple petal. I enjoy it in Guerlain's Le Metiorites.

Jan
28
2017
StellaDiverFlynn
StellaDiverFlynn

What a wonderful, inspiring article! Blind smelling really does help to take away a few preconceptions that we had and opens a new angle. The idea of the "representation", "utilization" and "interpretation" of a certain note is also spot on.

Violet also seems to have a wide range: woody and sweet as in Serge Lutens Bois de Violette, green and paired with leather in Balmain Jolie Madame, watery and dainty in Balenciage Paris and Dsquared She Wood, sweet and powdery in Guerlain Insolence EDP, herbal and spicy in Sammarco Ariel, astringent in Grey Flannel and Narciso Rodriguez for Him EDT. I'm sure there are a load more interesting options that I missed. :D

And we need a Best in Show of iris and violet! ↖(^ω^)↗

Jan
28
2017
Jyrhara
Jyrhara

The violets of my childhood had a most beautiful smell, that I can't find in any of the modern perfumes I've tried. The closest thing I found to "my" violet note was the one in vintage 1000 by Jean Patou, but it wasn't prominent enough for me. So I'm still looking...

Jan
28
2017
Karmalathe
Karmalathe

Thank you for this article! I love the idea of counterintuitiveness but also appreciate the choice of iris and violet, because I ´m on the lookout for both.
I very much like Silver Iris by Atelier Cologne - fairly linear but honest iris with amazing longevity.
My favourite violet so far is Dans tes bras by Frederic Malle - a weird, silent, intimate, slightly salty violet with santal drydown. I would love to try more "green" violets, with the aspect of crushed violet leaves on a shady forest clearing... any tips anyone?

Jan
28
2017
JoeG
JoeG

What an interesting experiment!! Thank you for the great article, John and Dr. Harrison! :)

Jan
27
2017
drugstore classics
drugstore classics

Yes, iris is hard to duplicate. The old fashioned, purple irises planted by my great grandmother DID have quite a fragrance! Heady and sweet and faintly powdery. I have yet to find a fragrance that totally captures their aura, but pleased indeed to own many a floriental that contains iris and orris root. To me, this purple flower (or even, the chemicals that sometimes approximate the velvety perfection!) cannot but improve anything to which is it added.

A simple, fresh Iris that many would enjoy is:

Yardley Iris

Possibly discontinued, but still available (as far as I know...).The opening is a bit more like lavender, but in a few moments you have a faint whiff of iris, alongside orris root and white musk. Not long lasting, but THE perfect summer cologne. :) I love to spray on cloth for best effect.

Jan
27
2017
Vegas Pauli
Vegas Pauli

Balenciaga Paris by Balenciaga smells exactly like Chowards Violet mints. Like exactly.

Jan
27
2017
celia46
celia46

This is such an interesting and creative way of review fragances! I really enjoy the reading!

Jan
27
2017
artemiss
artemiss

I like this series, as we all have certain scents we tend not be able to wear without discomfort.
I would have to say, that also being mostly anosmic to beta-ionone and beta-damascenone (random fact: it's a genetic trait that was also variable in our relatives the Neanderthals) that iris, violet and many other floral scents tend to also be notes I shy away from.

Mostly because they just smell weird and 'flat' to me, likely because I am only really getting the full effect of the alpha-ionones, and literally not smelling the same thing others are. I do love the what faint powdery whiffs I do get from violets, though, and love the what little scent I do get from my inherited tall purple irises, so I might have to give a few of these a sniff next time I see them..

Jan
27
2017
Macassar
Macassar

Ajaccio Violets - Trumper

Iris Silver Mist - Lutens

Grey Flannel - G. Beene

Aimez Moi - Caron

Jan
27
2017
donna255
donna255

I adore Iris and violet fragrances. Would lavender be classed in with the Blues?

Jan
27
2017
smelling_gr8
smelling_gr8

I adore iris and violet scents. Hiris was my first iris scent and I love love love it. I have just recently purchased L'attesa, another amazing iris scent.
As for violets, Devonshire violets is probably still my fave but De Profundis is pretty close. I like my violets fresh and dewy/wet.

Jan
27
2017
Filomena1941
Filomena1941

I adore iris perfumes and Hermes Hiris is one of my all-time perfumes of any perfumes. I am happy to see that others love it as well because for years it seems to have been maligned by many perfume lovers.

Jan
26
2017
Florista
Florista

28 La Pausa
Irisss
Iris Silver Mist

Jan
26
2017
vintage_scent
vintage_scent

I love my purples! Violets live in my heart;)
Iris/orris powdery and velvet I just discovered Iris Meadow it's gorgeous...

Jan
26
2017
Islandaromatika
Islandaromatika

Loved this article! And John, welcome to the "blue" side.

Hiris still stands as one of my all time favorite iris-centric perfumes. Contemporary and perfect, but then it's Olivia Giacobetti and I will admit to being quite a fanboy when it comes to her work! Can't wait to read the next installment! -Robert H.

Jan
26
2017
redskyatnight
redskyatnight

Yes! I needed to find out about Infusion d'Iris Absolue. Infusion d'Iris didn't work out so well for me but I'm on the hunt for good irises. Not too long ago I didn't like them either. It's good to try out all sorts of things because you might surprise yourself.

Jan
26
2017
lisa o
lisa o

La Pausa EDT!
Iris de Nuit!

Jan
26
2017
magie_nocturne
magie_nocturne

Iris poudre

Jan
26
2017
bookishbeauty
bookishbeauty

I loved the reviews of the scents without identifying them first. What a great idea. I would love to see more like this!

Jan
26
2017
smellagent
smellagent

The first day I registered on this site in my profile I say My heart belongs to powdery Iris. And I have and love a lot of violet perfumes. I like Iris any old way and when you were describing that pulpy mushy paper smell I salivated. I like em sweet as in Ferragammo Viola Essenziale. I like them dry and smelling like a vintage book store, Aedes Iris Nazarena. I prefer the Hermes Iris Ukiyoe over the Hiris but I love them both. A beautiful dc'd frag I wish they would bring back is L'occitane Notre Iris and finally my latest love L'attesa by Masque with both the Iris flower and the butter. I could list more but I think you get the point, I worship Iris. Violet is not much different with Penhaligon's Violetta being my all time fave. I love these blind perfume tests.

Jan
26
2017
DutchBalLover
DutchBalLover

Yes!! Iris is my middle name. Well it could be. Any cool powdery flowers really. Currently in love with Dior Homme EDT, my all time favorite being Prada's Infusion d'Iris EDP. For a quirkier mood, Penhaligon's Bluebell, and more serious occasions either Jacomo Silences or Serge Lutens Bas de Soie.

Jan
26
2017
kapted
kapted

I find these types of articles fascinating (thank you, Mr Biebel). A deeper sense of curiosity and raw emotion comes out. This is where perfume becomes beautiful; what it innocently elicits from a person.

Jan
26
2017

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